Policies

We have to be honest – Funmunitions was born from our desire to be full-time professional gamers and game designers. In order to make this dream a reality, we’ve decided to adopt the following business practices…

  1. We will keep our prices as low as we possibly can because we know what it is like to struggle financially. The first RPG manual we purchased back in the 1980’s was acquired ENTIRELY with rolled pennies – the best gaming tomes we own were uncovered second-hand or rescued from certain disuse.
  2. We will ALWAYS answer your questions about our products – we would love to help you fit them into your games – no question is a bad question! We will strive to keep as many feedback channels open to our customers as we can (email, forums, blog and store comments, surveys, etc.) because we’re truly interested in what you have to say! If you want us to design something we don’t offer – please do ask! This point is especially significant because we tend to design gaming supplements of unusual complexity and meticulous detail.
  3. If a customer purchases an item from us, they are entitled to all future versions of that product. Thus, if you buy “version 1.0” of a Funmunitions item, you will have access to versions 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, etc. If you download something from us once, you can download it for all time as much as you like. This will likely require some sort of product registration process, but we’re willing to do that to make this idea happen.
  4. If you find a typo or error in one of our gaming supplements, we’d love to know about it – and we WILL reward those who tell us about them with discounts, free stuff, and/or special recognition on our electronic media (web sites and social media).
  5. If you are unhappy with something you purchase from us we will do our best to make it right – please contact us and let us know! The ancient-arcane phrase of power is upheld here: “most est semper”, “El cliente siempre tiene la razón”, “The customer is always right!”
  6. As students and professors of social science, we uphold a concept we call “Gaming Relativity”: we don’t believe any game is better than any other game, that any method of playing a game is better than any other method, or that you can rank games based on arbitrary aesthetics. Well, you could do that, but what does it do to advance the enjoyment and study of all games? You might run serious games or silly games, “basic” games or “advanced” games, and we’re interested in all of them.